Thursday, 11 February 2016

Along with those that Keith has explained, I've been trying this cue.  This picture appeared on SPIKES' twitter feed today (https://twitter.com/BritAthletics/status/697675957847638016).  The picture shows twins who train together, but one clearly has her pelvis tipped further forwards.  They appear to be at the same point in the stride cycle (albeit opposite legs).



Coincidentally, I've been dabbling with the pelvis tilted further forward than my legacy running style, and it feels very balanced.  It can be achieved at all paces, and I'm convinced it helps me land under the hips more successfully.

I am also aware that over tilting the pelvis forwards can cause injury, but I don't think there's any danger of that for me.  I'll film again soon just to be sure.



5 comments:

  1. Any cue that help you get precision balance on landing is great - we're all slightly different and at different stages in runner-body development. :-) As you continually land precisely balanced the glutes will build and I see that changing the pelvic angle too :-)

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  2. Fantastic. And yes, I am seeing (well, feeling) the glutes building now!

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  3. Fascinating updates, David, and looking great in your video clip below.

    Out of interest, how does one go about changing the pelvic angle, please? Or does it follow from correctly executing all the elements that Keith and Heidi coach in their book?

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  4. Ah, Adrian, this is a simple one! I was guilty of "sucking in" my stomach too much - probably too vain - so now I have relaxed the stomach, and pull the lower spine forwards.

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  5. Generally it works automatically once the runner feels balanced on landings - then everything else must be right. And simply landing balanced (with the supporting foot as near as humanly possible to under the hips) must build all the right supporting muscles. About 10,000 good landings per hour will produce the right stance and shape :-) We see it all the time. Even young teens who walk like baby giraffes - no glutes, knock-knees, 'flat feet', feet pointing out. Get them into flat shoes and teach them to run well - a year or two later and they are looking great - strong, fast and great shape. I see it every year at the school I coach at winter time. Make the right action and the muscles and stance must follow :-) Keep up the great work.

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